Sunday, March 18, 2018

Time management

Oddly I have found scheduling interviews by subgroups rather liberating as I use one set of questions for a few interviews then switch to the next set. My brain is on overload having done eight interviews so far with another thirteen left to do.

The process is becoming easier as I do more interviews yet I sometimes question if the interview almost becomes more a conversation as participants feel open to dialogue. Remaining objective is challenging as I have already found common themes just from doing the interviews. Transcribing the interviews will be laborious but the collection of data on questionnaires has been liberating and has helped identify other possible reasons for themes to develop and occur.

I think I am follow the ideals of my physical therapist who requires repetition of exercises in sets of three when I schedule these interviews. More than three interviews per day would drain me of almost all my emotional energy.

Has anyone else had to navigate multiple forms of communication when doing interviews? Landline phones, mobile phones, FaceTime, Skype, written interviews via email for persons whose schedules are too hectic to allow for personal time, and face to face interviews. I think the research inquiry/project is definitely affecting my opinion of technology and how much more I do not know. However, I am unsure that means I want to use more technology.

Time for the second interview of the day. And just FYI, some interviews are opening up more leads on interviews. I will definitely need to limit how many more additional people wish to be interviewed.

11 comments:

  1. I find Time Management the hardest part of my life. I have 3 kids(under 5), and a school with three divisions. finding any time to research, or have the energy to research is extremely difficult, I think I will be doing almost everything I have to do on Sundays now!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I thought I had gotten away from doing school work on Sundays when I completed the BA and no longer had to take 4.5 hour bus rides to NYC every Sunday for five hours of classes. Finding time for reading dry books has become my challenge.I find I am upsetting people with poor manners as I read at every meal no matter where I am. The field work is more exhilirating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am with you on the upsetting people with poor manners, I in trouble all the time for "not paying attention" anymore.

      Delete
  3. Davis. Thank you for this blog. I am looking forward to the transcribing of interviews and reading on strategies to record and transcribe them. You must be exhausted! So many interviews to document. It is encouraging to read that you are finding new themes emerging as this is my endeavor. Remaining objective will be my greatest challenge also and resisting the urge to take the lead and in turn distort the inquiry in doing this by asking direct questions. I would still prefer to interview face to face (not facetime or skype) but understand this isn't always realistic. Technology can be so useful and yet somehow as dancers we find it more difficult to really 'feel' our way around an interview through a flat screen, a phone in the same way as transcribing or recording doesn't quite fulfill the real 'lived' experience. You are one Module ahead as I am still in the beginning of planning the inquiry but it is so enthralling! Good luck with the remaining interviews. Collectively they will be well worth the time!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Skype and FaceTime are not so bad because they incorporate video so I can read faces and interpret hand gestures. At least the Skype interviews in the USA have utilized video but the people in the UK and Europe have been hesitant to use video with Skype. But I am not sure that is a theme that truly matters to the project. It might be though based on how respondents answer as other themes develop. I hope I am able to get all my interviews scheduled for Wednesday done before we lose power. The winter storms hitting DC expect a layer of ice before snowfall. So power loss is typical with ice. Always an adventure trying to fit things into what nature brings.

      Delete
  4. Hi Davis, would love to share my experience with the interviews I did last term and transcribing. I did all my interviews face to face which I thought would be the best method for me. One interview included a day in another town which meant a plane to and from and a day out of my schedule. It was interesting how this interviewee put aside all her plans that day to spend the day with me. I was touched that she went to so much trouble. The interview (my first) was relaxed and although nervous I enjoyed it. The second was in total contrast to the first and I felt that it didn't go so well! Transcribing the first interview was so hard. She spoke in her native tongue and when coming to transcribe the interview I didn't allow enough time as I tried to understand her accent and speed of the conversation! I didn't anticipate that problem. Transcribing the interviews verbatim used so much time, but I was scared I'd miss something and so decided to use this method! It was a long process for me. I realised though, how I like to do things "properly", taking no short-cuts. This seems to be reflected in my teaching too. Seemed I learnt something about myself, that I didn't know from before!Sam

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sam,

    I would have loved to visit in person; however, I experienced life in three time zones yesterday. The first was in Norway then I interviewed someone in England and later someone in New York City. Today is a day off from interviews as the ice and snow is accumulating quite a bit and power keeps going out. Silly drivers who should stay home and quit running into power lines.

    Tomorrow I interview people in North Carolina then New York City then San Francisco. For once in my life I am extremely grateful for technology. Skype and FaceTime are rapidly becoming my friends. Saturday will be busy traveling between time zones again as I interview people in Florida,the lake district of England,then back to New York City. Friday will be unusual as I will be doing three local interviews or at least within an hour's drive of home.

    As I do more interviews I find I am more at ease doing the interview and respondents are much more open to sharing their thoughts. The power just went out again so I better get off the computer adn save battery power.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sounds like things are going well, even if exhausting! A note on the transcription, there's a lot of companies out there that will transcribe for about $1/min, which can save you a good step depending on how long the interviews are and how much money you have to spare. I still edit transcription as my day job (I've been doing transcription and captioning for almost five years now) and while I enjoy it, I know many people find it a really brutal part of the research process. If you don't have the finances for sending it out, there's also software that you can buy relatively inexpensively, if you don't already have it, that will make it much faster. A good rate is 3-1, 3 minutes of work for 1 minute of audio, so if you're significantly slower than that it might be well worth the expense to outsource it.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for your post!
    I am in the stages of planning my inquiry and have been reading around research methods and data collection and interviewing is a area I am considering.
    I'm struggling with time management with my literature review, I'm finding it a bit overwhelming atm trying to get through books, journals and articles hopefully this will pass.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Garry,

    I have found that reading journals and articles are quite fun even though these forums have often led to more reading. Oddly the texts for the modules is drier than the medical journals and articles I have been reading throughout this process. Perhaps I am just tired of reading big words that could be switched with simpler smaller words. I love vocabulary but find that since my research process includes the English language as understood in many different regions of the world I am bogged down by translating and interpreting the meaning of words and phrases before I am able to read an entire sentence or paragraph completely without stopping. Reading while doing heat for physical therapy may also be affecting the way I view the texts for the modules as I am unsure if the heat or the books are putting me to sleep. Or perhaps I am just that exhausted.

    ReplyDelete